Bruchsal Palace in Germany, photo and description

Review: Excursion to Bruchsal Palace (Baden-Württemberg, Germany) – Destroyed by American bombing and rebuilt

Digging through the photo archives and came across a series of photos of me and my wife going to Bruchsal Castle. This was in the year two thousand nine. Then I did not know about the existence of “Otzovik”. Therefore I clicked a few photos. Yes, and somehow it was lazy. It seems that I was there after some shootings, after which neither a camera nor a camcorder did not want to hold. And in addition, in some rooms of the castle was not allowed to take photos. And as a result there were not enough photos for a review. I’m not used to so sparingly, with almost no photos to write a travel review. What can you do, I write about this tour with what is.

I will try to remember how it happened. It goes like this.

It was on a spring Sunday in April of two thousand nine years. Right on Lenin’s birthday. The weather was beautiful. It was a sin not to use such a rare phenomenon in Germany.

My wife began to terrorize me: “Where shall we go for a walk today? Look it up on the Internet. “

What can’t you do for your beloved wife? You can’t do this and you can’t do that.

Went to the computer, sighing. And he turned it on. Pressed a button. Then I put in the password. Then I googled foxy. Moved the “keyboard” to him and typed into the search box “Schloesser Baden-Wuerttemberg. That is, “castles Baden-Wuerttemberg. The main criteria for searching were the distance of one hundred kilometers and “we were not there yet.

Bruchsal Castle is located eighty-two kilometers from our home. That is if we take the shortest route through the settlements. It seems to be not far. But long. Given the speed limit of up to fifty kilometers per hour through the settlements in Germany.

Google gave me three routes. The shortest route was the longest – one hour and fifty minutes. The middle route was the fastest. – One hour and seventeen. Not all of it managed to take the autobahn, because only part of the way was through populated areas anyway. But reasonably balanced by a combination of expressways and country roads. Therefore, the road with a predominance of only high-speed autobahn turned out to be not only the longest in length, but also in time.

READ
Windsor Castle residence of British monarchs

No need to be clairvoyant to guess the route we took. We left around noon. So while we had arrived, while parked, while we came to the palace, it was about two in the afternoon.

Bruchsal Palace

A large courtyard of the complex. In addition to the palace itself in the courtyard are buildings built in the same style, but for practical purposes. For the servants, the kitchen and other things.

This baroque castle was built in the year one thousand seven hundred and twentieth. By whom and for whom can be found elementary in wikipedia. So I will not write about it here. Otherwise you know who will swear))).

Bruchsal Palace

As a result of American bombing in March 1, 1946, eighty percent of the city was destroyed. According to the official data, over one thousand people, mostly civilians, were killed. The palace complex was almost completely destroyed and burned out by fire almost completely. The staircase of the palace remained intact. The reconstruction of the palace began with it in 1936.

Bruchsal Palace

Thanks to various paintings, drawings, and plans of the palace, it was possible to reconstruct this monument of history and architecture almost in its original form.

Bruchsal Palace

Damian’s Gate can be seen in the background. Various exhibitions are regularly held in this historic building: paintings, photographs, and sculptures.

Bruchsal Palace

We got ready to go into the main building of the complex to visit the jukebox museum exhibit there.

Bruchsal Palace

Here we enter the museum. You can see different automatic organs. All exhibits are working. Some of them were shown to us.

Bruchsal Palace

This jukebox in the picture was working when we were there. The pipes of the OrgAn were blowing out a fancy melody from the time of Handel and Mozart. The puppets moved their arms and legs to the beat, shook and turned their heads. The people in attendance were absolutely delighted.

READ
Wörlitz Castle and Park Kingdom in Germany

I wish I had known about the existence of Otzovik. Otherwise I would have photographed like a machine gun “Maxim” everything.

Bruchsal Palace

The museum told me that it was undesirable to take photos. So I took photos rarely and stealthily.

Bruchsal Palace

The ceiling paintings, as well as the entire palace, were restored from pre-war photographs and other surviving documents.

Bruchsal Palace

The work was gigantic. The workmanship of the artists-restorers was simply superb.

Bruchsal Palace

More than once I have held photoshoots with the newlyweds in these rooms. Unfortunately I have no right to display their photos on public view. From the word “in general”.

Bruchsal Palace

But the entourage for romantic photos here is very good.

Bruchsal Palace

The murals on the walls and the atmosphere of the palace are very romantic.

Bruchsal Palace

Well, it’s time to go out for some fresh air. Looked through everything.

Bruchsal Palace

We went out into the fresh air from the coolness of the building cooled down for the winter. On the territory of the palace complex there was an exhibition of agricultural goods and products.

Before telling about the exhibition I think it is necessary to tell a little about life in Germany. Because being a guest here or living permanently are different things.

Most people in Germany live in rented apartments. A minority have their own apartments and houses. And not only because it’s expensive. It’s also because a lot of people live where they have jobs. Unemployment is very high, and that’s why people don’t look for jobs closer to their homes, but for housing closer to work. But, nevertheless, commuting to work about a hundred kilometers every day is practically next door. Such daily commutes are the order of the day. It is normal to spend up to an hour to get to work in the city of Stuttgart itself. I used to take public transport to the other end of the city for almost fifty minutes. By car I was saving ten minutes. And that’s a distance of only twelve kilometers. So I mostly took the U-Bahn (subway) with a change to the S-Bahn (a type of train that runs in the region around Stuttgart). My older brother didn’t work in Stuttgart sixty kilometers from home and spent the same amount of time commuting. Because on the expressway and the speed is higher and there are no traffic lights.

READ
Zolochevsky castle Lviv region, detailed description

Therefore, you should buy or build your own place only when you are absolutely sure that you won’t lose your job. Then people take out loans from banks and pay it off over twenty or thirty years. Sometimes the children end up paying off these loans, if the contract stipulates it. But the bank may not give a loan if you have a bad credit record, or if you have passed a certain critical age, when the bank is not sure you will have time to pay the loan before you retire.

In Germany, as probably in many other countries, including Russia, those who want to have “dachas” and some have their own garden plots. These are those who have their own houses. Dacha plots range in size from literally one hundred square meters. They often have a shed in case it rains, a meter by meter shed for a haymaker and a shovel, and a grill. There are plots from municipalities, where there’s a waiting list for many years and it’s a great blessing to get them. There are plots owned by private individuals, which are leased in this way. But those who really want to find a plot to satisfy their desire to dig a garden bed or plant flowers and have a shish kebab, they can find a site to their money. At least our fellow Kuban villagers, who wanted it, found it.

This regional agricultural exhibition was for all those people.

Bruchsal Palace

The first thing I photographed was this trade stand where various products for healthy eating were sold. I was interested in the flour that was being milled in the old water mill with stone millstones. They also sold wheat bread, rampson pesto, various spreads on bread, apple chips, traditional Southern German fruit bread, and spelt cakes with citrus peel.

Bruchsal Palace

Both natives and members of the Turkish diaspora, identifiable by the scarves tied around their neckerchiefs, came to this exhibition. There weren’t any refugees from Arab countries back then.

READ
Malahide Castle in Ireland, description and photo

Bruchsal Palace

What wasn’t on sale here for amateur gardeners and vegetable growers. And different gardening tools: watering cans, pruners, rakes, lawn mowers, and all kinds of other things. Various accessories for grilling, canopies and tents in case of bad weather, garden furniture and so on and so on.

All this alternated with beer tents selling traditional grilled chicken and different kinds of grilled sausages. Germans cannot do without it.

Bruchsal Palace

Here we came upon the already blooming flowers, which were sold together with pots.

Bruchsal Palace

And this is the stand with costume jewelry. Since women will come to the exhibition, it is clear that there is a place for jewelry dealers.

Bruchsal Palace

The weather was fine and the exhibition was great. People were rejoicing at the spring sunshine, trying to accumulate a positive in case the weather turns bad. And it happens quite often. It seems like the sun is shining, but in a quarter of an hour it can rain.

Bruchsal Palace

That’s how we accidentally celebrated the birthday of the Leader of the World Proletariat on April 27th of the year 2000).

Bruchsal Palace: One of the most beautiful and luxurious baroque complexes in Germany.

In 1720, the bishop duke of Speyer, Damian Hugo von Schönborn, decided to build himself a new palace. It was caused by the fact that the old one had suffered a lot during the war for the Palatinate succession. In those distant years the model for the construction of palaces was Versailles. The luxurious new residence of the bishop – the Bruchsal Palace – was no exception.

The construction of the palace lasted for quite a long time. One of the reasons was that Damian Hugo, being an art connoisseur, constantly interfered in the construction process. It was difficult for the architects to work with him, and they often changed.

Bruchsal Palace

Photo: maxmann / pixabay (CC0 Creative Commons)

READ
Neuschwanstein castle, how to get there, ticket prices

Bruchsal Palace

Bruchsal Palace

Photo: maxmann / pixabay (CC0 Creative Commons)

Johann Maximilian von Welsch started the construction, but after a while he was replaced by Anselm Franz von Ritter Groenstein. Because of his conflicts with the bishop, he could not finish the building either. Then Balthasar Neumann was brought in.

Bruchsal Palace

Photo: lapping / pixabay (CC0 Creative Commons)

Bruchsal Palace

Bruchsal Palace

He designed the central part of the main building with a magnificent main staircase leading to the two grand halls, the Princes’ Hall and the Marble Hall. This staircase became a stumbling block between the architects and Damian Hugo, who decided that he needed an additional floor between the first and second levels of the staircase to accommodate servants and dressing rooms, which did not fit in at all with the existing staircase design.

Neumann was able to solve this problem. He gave the staircase an oval shape and brought it to the necessary height. Two curved steps lead from the central vestibule to the upper hall. Some art historians call it the “Queen of German Stairs.”

Bruchsal Palace

The new palace complex consisted of about 50 separate buildings of different purposes. The interior decoration of the palace is striking. To decorate the interiors, the best artists and sculptors of the time were involved. The magnificent frescoes and paintings, as well as colorful facades are made by Italian artist Giovanni Francesco Marchini.

Bruchsal Palace

Photo: maxpixel (CC0 Public Domain)

Bruchsal Palace

Photo: lapping / pixabay (CC0 Creative Commons)

Bruchsal Palace

Photo: maxpixel (CC0 Public Domain)

There’s also a stunning chapel on the compound.

Bruchsal Palace

Photo: maxpixel (CC0 Public Domain)

Bruchsal Palace

Photo: maxpixel (CC0 Public Domain)

But at the beginning of the 19th century, after the separation of the church from the state, the Bruchsal Palace lost its grandeur. For a period it was used to house a military hospital and all the frescoes were painted over.

Bruchsal Palace

Bruchsal Palace

Bruchsal Palace

During World War II, the palace was almost completely destroyed, but, surprisingly, the famous staircase survived.

Bruchsal Palace

Bruchsal Palace

Bruchsal Palace

And only in 1964, the state government of Baden-Wuerttemberg began to restore it. Today, the restored palace is available to the public. It houses the Bruchsal Museum and the German Museum of jukeboxes.

Rating
( No ratings yet )
Like this post? Please share to your friends:
Free Travels And Tours
Leave a Reply

;-) :| :x :twisted: :smile: :shock: :sad: :roll: :razz: :oops: :o :mrgreen: :lol: :idea: :grin: :evil: :cry: :cool: :arrow: :???: :?: :!: