The shortest street – Ebenezer Place in Scotland. Description, pictures

The most unusual streets in the world

The Guinness Book of Records is not only an amazing reference book, but also a worthy guide for the traveler. This is a story about five streets that, at the very least, deserve to be in this book.

Ebenezer Place is the shortest street in the world.

“Blink and you’ll miss Ebenezer Place,” writes Anne Ward, author of a guide to unusual places, “Nothing to See Here: A Guide to Scotland’s Secret Joys.”

Located in the Scottish town of Wick between Union Street and River Street, Ebenezer Place is recognized as the shortest street in the world and is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records. It is only 2.06 metres long, compared to the previous record of 5.2 metres set by Elgin Street in Lancashire. There is only one No. 1 house on the street, a bistro that is part of the Mackays Hotel.

Although Ebenezer Place only recently made it to the Guinness Book of World Records, it was built quite a long time ago, in 1883.

At the time, a gentleman named Alexander Sinclair, having made his fortune in America, returned to Vic and built the Mackays Hotel at the intersection of Union Street and River Street. The mayor of the city suggested that he give his name to a small part of the building. So he did. Four years later, Ebenezer Place appeared on the city map.

Baldwin Street is the coolest street in the world

The street is located in a city in the southern part of New Zealand. Baldwin Street is deservedly the steepest street in the world. This long 350-meter street starts with a slight incline and then rises steeply and reaches a maximum incline of 1: 2.86 or 19 degrees. The street is so steep that its surface had to be paved with concrete instead of asphalt. Otherwise, on a warm day, the tar would just run down the slope.

9 de Julio Ave.

9 de Julio Avenue (or Avenida 9 de Juliona in the local language), located in the center of Buenos Aires, Argentina, is the widest street. It is as many as nine lanes divided by a median into opposite traffic streams. Getting to the other side before the traffic light changes will only be the luckiest person with the longest legs and who is good at running. Pedestrians usually need a few extra minutes and 2-3 traffic signal changes. 9 de Julio Avenue is only 1 kilometer long, but it is as much as 110 meters wide.

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The unusual width of the street is due to the fact that it covers an entire city block – the distance between two streets in staggered order, because this kind of common in Buenos Aires. The avenue stretches west from the Rio de la Plata promenade, from the Retiro neighborhood in the north to the Constitución station in the south. It has up to seven lanes in each direction and two more lanes on either side of the parallel streets.

The street extends in both directions and connects parts of the metropolis. Along the way you can see some of the main landmarks of Buenos Aires, including the Obelisk, which is located in the center of 9 de Julio, the French Embassy, the statue of Don Quixote, the Teatro Colón and the former Ministry of Communications Construction, which is located at the intersection of the avenue with Via Moreno.

The construction of the street was first planned in 1888, but the landlords and local residents opposed it, so work did not begin until 1935. Even the French government refused to demolish the building, as did the locals, who considered it an architectural masterpiece. It began in 1937, and the main section of the avenue was completed in 1960. The southern portions were completed after 1980. Clearing the way required major changes in the Constitution Square area.

San Francisco’s sloping streets.

The city of San Francisco is famous for its rolling hills and incredible sloping streets. But what would San Francisco be without steep hills? Photographer Dan Angie tried to equalize the streets with a tilted camera, resulting in a unique gallery of the city.

“Snake Alley,” the world’s most crooked street.

The name of the world’s most crooked street speaks for itself. Most publications recognize Lombard Street in San Francisco, California as the street that has the most twists and turns. Robert Ripley’s Believe It or Not Museum once referred to “Snake Alley” in Burlington, Iowa as “the most winding street in the world” after Robert Ripley himself saw it in 1940. The idea is quite romantic, but still, Lombard Street in San Francisco has a bit more twists and turns. “Snake Alley” has seven steep turns on a stretch of 84 meters and rises 17.8 meters (21%).

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It was built by the German founders of the city in 1894 for an experiment to help overcome the physical limitations and steep rise of Heritage Hill.

The road was intended to connect the downtown business district and surrounding area with the shopping district located on North Sixth Street, part of which is Snake Alley. Three German immigrants conceived and implemented the idea of creating a winding street winding downhill, similar to the paths between vineyards in France and Germany.

The street was completed in 1898, but was originally called by a different name because it was part of North Sixth Street. A few years later, a resident noted that it resembled a snake going down the slope, and the name caught on. The alley is paved with limestone and blue clay bricks. The bricks were laid at an angle to make it easier for the horses to descend. Unfortunately, going up the alley often leads to surprises at the top, so, even to this day, Snake Alley remains a one-way street, and only involves downhill traffic. Nevertheless, once a year bikers organize the Snake Alley Criterium, a group race in which they ride uphill.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world, listed in the Guinness Book of Records

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

TravelAsk will tell you about 5 streets that are so amazing that they made it into the Guinness Book of World Records.

Ebenezer Place, Scotland.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

This street is justly considered the shortest street in the world. It is located in Wick between River Street and Union Street. Ann Ward, who wrote a guidebook to Scotland’s quaint places, described this street in his book: “Blink and you miss Ebenezer Place.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

Ebenezer Place is exactly 2.06 meters long and there is only one house on it: House No. 1. It is a bistro owned by the Mackays Hotel. And although the street appeared in the Book of Records relatively recently, it was built at the end of the 19th century – in 1883.

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The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

Then a wealthy man named Alexander Sinclair decided to open the Mackays Hotel in Wick at the intersection of River Street and Union Street. Then the mayor of the city advised Sinclair to name the part of the building that happened to be between the two streets. And so, four years later, Ebenezer Place was placed on the city map.

Baldwin Street, New Zealand

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

This is the steepest street in the world, located in the south of New Zealand.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

Baldwin Street is 350 meters long and its angle of inclination reaches 19 degrees. The street is so steep that workers had to pave it with concrete instead of asphalt, otherwise the sun-heated tar would simply flow down the slope.

9 de Julio Avenue, Argentina

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The street is located in the capital of Argentina – in the heart of Buenos Aires. It is notable because it is 110 meters wide, which is 9 lanes of traffic. Before pedestrians manage to cross 9 de Julio Avenue, the traffic light signal will change 2 or 3 times.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

Driving along this street you can see such important landmarks of the city as the statue of Don Quixote, the former Ministry of Communications Construction and the French Embassy.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The construction of 9 de Julio Avenue began in 1937 and in 1960 the main part of the avenue was completed. The southern sections were built after 1980. Because of the clearing of the path, major changes had to be made in the area around Plaza Constitucion.

Sloping Streets, San Francisco.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

San Francisco is known for its steep hills and unusual sloping streets. Dan Angie attempted to equalize these streets in his photographs with the tilt of the camera. The result is a very curious gallery of San Francisco streets.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

“Snake Alley,” Burlington

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

“Snake Alley” held the status as the winding street with the most twists and turns, until Lombard Street in San Francisco, which has a few more twists, was recognized as such. Snake Alley has. has seven sharp turns and an elevation of 17.8 meters.

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The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The road was built in 1894 as an experiment to overcome the sharp rise of Heritage Hill. The creators sought to make the road winding down the slope similar to the paths between the vineyards of Germany and France.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

In 1898 construction was completed, but it was named differently than it is now. Only a few years later one of the locals noticed that the road looks like a snake crawling down the slope. As a result, that’s what the road became known as. “Snake Alley” is a one-way street that only faces downhill for convenience so you don’t have to go uphill.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

TravelAsk will tell you about 5 streets that are so amazing that they made it into the Guinness Book of World Records.

Ebenezer Place, Scotland.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

This street is justly considered the shortest street in the world. It is located in Wick between River Street and Union Street. Ann Ward, who wrote a guidebook to Scotland’s quaint places, described this street in his book: “Blink and you miss Ebenezer Place.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

Ebenezer Place is exactly 2.06 meters long and there is only one house on it: House No. 1. It is a bistro owned by the Mackays Hotel. And although the street appeared in the Book of Records relatively recently, it was built at the end of the 19th century – in 1883.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

Then a wealthy man named Alexander Sinclair decided to open the Mackays Hotel in Wick at the intersection of River Street and Union Street. Then the mayor of the city advised Sinclair to name the part of the building that happened to be between the two streets. And so, four years later, Ebenezer Place was placed on the city map.

Baldwin Street, New Zealand

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

This is the steepest street in the world, located in the south of New Zealand.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

Baldwin Street is 350 meters long and its angle of inclination reaches 19 degrees. The street is so steep that workers had to pave it with concrete instead of asphalt, otherwise the sun-heated tar would simply flow down the slope.

READ
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9 de Julio Avenue, Argentina

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The street is located in the capital of Argentina – in the heart of Buenos Aires. It is notable because it is 110 meters wide, which is 9 lanes of traffic. Before pedestrians manage to cross 9 de Julio Avenue, the traffic light signal will change 2 or 3 times.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

Driving along this street you can see such important landmarks of the city as the statue of Don Quixote, the former Ministry of Communications Construction and the French Embassy.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The construction of 9 de Julio Avenue began in 1937 and in 1960 the main part of the avenue was completed. The southern sections were built after 1980. Because of the clearing of the path, major changes had to be made in the area around Plaza Constitucion.

Sloping Streets, San Francisco.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

San Francisco is known for its steep hills and unusual sloping streets. Dan Angie attempted to equalize these streets in his photographs with the tilt of the camera. The result is a very curious gallery of San Francisco streets.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

“Snake Alley,” Burlington

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

“Snake Alley” held the status as the winding street with the most twists and turns, until Lombard Street in San Francisco, which has a few more twists, was recognized as such. Snake Alley has. has seven sharp turns and an elevation of 17.8 meters.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

The road was built in 1894 as an experiment to overcome the sharp rise of Heritage Hill. The creators sought to make the road winding down the slope similar to the paths between the vineyards of Germany and France.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

In 1898 construction was completed, but it was named differently than it is now. Only a few years later one of the locals noticed that the road looks like a snake crawling down the slope. As a result, that’s what the road became known as. “Snake Alley” is a one-way street that only faces downhill for convenience so you don’t have to go uphill.

The 5 most unusual streets in the world listed in the Guinness Book of World Records

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